Now I Feel Silly Wanting Turn Based Battles Back In RPG’s


PeteI’ve mentioned Final Fantasy a few times over the last few months, either about the incredible news of a Final Fantasy VII remake or my cautious optimism concerning Final Fantasy XV.  One opinion I had was, as it turns out, a rather silly one – I believed a return to a turn based battle system in both games would be for the best.

I now appreciate that I’m wrong.

In my defence I didn’t mean a direct cut and paste of most 90’s RPGs with prettier graphics; more like turn based with a few added features thrown in – a little like Final Fantasy XIII’s battle mode, which was about the only thing that game did right.  After watching gameplay footage of Final Fantasy VII recently I was starting to think maybe a more action-oriented approach was the right decision (especially armed with the knowledge that the game is a ‘re-imagining’ rather than a straight up remake), but after seeing the following footage from Final Fantasy XV I now appreciate that this way of fighting is the only way forward.

This just looks incredible, and we’re hopefully approaching a release date too – rumours are rampant for a Summer 2016 release, with the announcement hopefully being made at the end of March.

Stardew Valley – What Harvest Moon Fans Need


Banner8

Pete*UPDATE* You can read our Stardew Valley Review here.

I’ve been a fan of Harvest Moon since it first came to the Super Nintendo console in 1998.  Since then I’ve owned and played several of the sequels spanning across almost every console Nintendo has made, and put hundreds of hours into the series overall.

One of my favourites and one I probably put the most time into was Animal Parade on the Wii.  Unfortunately that was the last of the Harvest Moon titles to see a release on home consoles in 2008, with everything else since being made exclusively for handhelds – and handheld gaming is something I’ve never quite been invested in, not for want of trying.

gfs_125147_2_5So, eight years later and with a Wii U release of a new Harvest Moon game (or Story of Seasons as it’s now known) looking increasingly unlikely, ‘ConcernedApe,’ a one man developer, has created Stardew Valley and it looks impressive.

Scheduled for release on February 26th 2016, it boasts a handful of familiar features essential to the farming simulation / RPG genre.  There are a ton of customisation options for both your house and character, and an interesting leveling mechanic that pulls the game more towards an RPG style than a straight up farming simulator by way of improving five different key skills – farming, mining, combat, fishing, and foraging.  Add to that a thriving local community, places to explore and creating the ultimate farm, this game is looking like the game PC and Harvest Moon fans have been waiting for.

Continue reading

Top 10 Albums of 2015


PeteSomething a little different from the usual stuff found here, this time Pete, uh, plays music rather than video games.  Not as much as I have in previous years but enough to form a pretty comprehensive top 10 list, including some metal, post rock and some pretty out-there electronic music too.  I like to think I have a reasonably eclectic taste so hopefully there might be something here you can either relate to or better yet a totally new artist you might like the sound of.  So without further ado, here are my top ten albums for 2015.

10. Panopticon – Autumn Eternal

Panopticon is a one-man metal band from the US fusing all sorts of genres together, starting Autum Eternal with a soothing country ballad before exploding into the more familiar black metal-esque sound that is prominent throughout the majority of the rest of album.  It’s haunting and raw melodies are what make this album as good as it is and the drumming by Austin Dunn is as spectacular as his other work; he performs stellar guest drumming on Saor’s ‘Aura’ album which is what first drew me to his own project.

9. Ruby The Hatchet – Valley of The Snake

The best stoner metal release of 2015 by far, combining head-nodding riffs, catchy melodies and familiar grooves found throughout the genre going back to the 1970’s.  Enjoyable from start to finish particularly for a debut album, the addition of an organ really makes Valley of The Snake stand out too.

8. Skeletal Remains – Condemned To Misery

One of the most anticipated death metal releases of the year, Skeletal Remains did not disappoint with the release of Condemned To Misery.  It brings nothing new to the genre but when proper throwbacks to the heyday of the genre are hard to find this does what it sets out to do perfectly, with crushing riffs, pounding drums and vocals that compliment the chaos, Skeletal Remains comfortably take the crown of best death metal release of 2015.

Continue reading

Early Access Games – How Long Is Too Long?


‘Early Access’ is the idea of releasing an incomplete game to the public in alpha or beta form and allowing them to effectively test the game and feed back any issues, bugs or ideas to the developers.  When the idea works it’s a great way for developer and consumer to communicate, and can be a great way for gamers to shape the direction an early access game is going in.  A good example of an early access title done correctly is Prison Architect, a game that has been in development for some time but the team constantly release monthly updates and continually listen to feedback the fans have given them.  As a result the game has gathered a lot of momentum and made a fair amount of money for Introvision Software as each update provides either new gameplay features or important ‘bug bashes’ but along the way incorporates fan feedback both positive and negative.  Eventually a full game will be available that’ll be a unique collaboration between fans and developers, and for me personally it’s been quite the thrill ride along the way, I’ve been watching the game grow since Alpha 8 and we’re now approaching Alpha 36.

Prison Architect is how early access should be done

Prison Architect is how early access should be done

On the other hand early access can go horribly wrong. Towns is one of the most high profile examples of this, it was one of the first ten games released under the Steam Greenlight banner and also the first to be released as an early access title.  Despite a lot of hype and more than 200,000 copies sold – a reasonable amount for an indie game – the man behind Towns suddenly abandoned the game citing lack of money made as the main reason.  He then almost immediately moved on to other projects and even had the audacity to openly talk about ideas for Towns 2, and as a result those who bought the first Towns game have vowed to boycott anything the guy is involved in for the foreseeable future.

The point is games like Towns and numerous others have dented the reputation of the early access model, to the point where only about 25% of games actually make it to a final release, or at least what the developers consider to be that.  Gamers are understandably a lot more cautious when it comes to parting with their money, but at least with Steam updating their policy or early access games it’s now easier to discover how early access games are progressing simply by looking at the information page about the game.  If there has been no news from the delopers for a while avoid it, whereas if there are continual updates available it might be worth investing your time and money into it.  Another example of this is with Ark: Survival Evolved (a game that Alan and I actually play quite regularly), updates are released almost every other day so it’s easy to see e developers are still serious about releasing a finished title.  Of course there is still the risk that it could be abandoned like so many others, but with the amount of support that game has they’d be foolish to do that, and of course further dent the early access model for future games.

Continue reading

Why Do Game Developers No Longer Give Any Info On Their Newest Games?


imagePeteI used the love the thrill of reading through a magazine as a child to find out all the latest news on an upcoming game.  How it was being developed, what features were being included, when it was being released.  I’d hang on every word about how it would revolutionize a console or become the start of a next big franchise, and then a few months later read an in-depth review in the weeks leading up to the big day, with a final score rating of 9/10.  I’d ingested enough information by that point to know that I had to have this particular game, so I took my pocket money and slapped a pre-order on that bad boy and come release day I was never disappointed.  Super Mario 64, Civilization II, Gran Turismo, all favourites of my childhood for one reason – I’d done my homework on all of them, because I had my trusty gaming magazines to conduct my research.

I miss that thrill.  It doesn’t exist anymore and not because commercial Internet all but wiped out gaming magazines as a few still exist, but because the information simply isn’t there anymore.  Gone are the days of extensive previews, new pieces of news filtering out of the developers office every week in the buildup to a release, now everything is all hush-hush to the point where at times I know very little about a game until I actually play it.

Continue reading

Can Assassins Creed Syndicate Save The Series?


assassins-creed

PeteThe Assassins Creed series is one that divides anyone who has ever played them.  They divide Alan and I in fact, he buys the collectors edition of every new title the day of release whereas I’m… Not so keen on them.  Don’t get me wrong, it isn’t as simple as Alan loving Assassins Creed and I hating it, even the individual games divide me as I wasn’t keen on the first Assassins Creed nor Unity overall, but I thoroughly enjoyed Black Flag, the fourth main game in the series. As it happens I recently bought Assassins Creed II, so I’m giving the whole thing a fair shot by now owning four of the main titles.

What I think divides fans of the series so much, particularly recently, is the mess surrounding the release of Unity.  In the buildup to its release a lot of emphasis was placed on its four player co-op mode, and at first we must have missed something as we thought that feature was available throughout the entire game, it wasn’t until later we realised it wasn’t and then when we both played it realised further still that there were only a handful of co-op missions available altogether.  However that was more of a personal gripe we had (not to mention the only reason why I personally bought it), the major problems were with bugs.  And my goodness were they plentiful, just watch this video for proof of that:

We’ve encountered our fair share of those bugs and several others too, in fact we’ve done an Alan And Pete Play video on Assassins Creed Unity where the bugs are plentiful – at one point Alan losing his temper because his character is just wildly flapping his sword around is one such occasion.  The underlying issue for all this was effectively due to Ubisoft rushing and ultimately releasing an unfinished game, and although they eventually put out huge patches to make the game somewhat playable and even released their downloadable content Dead Kings for free as a way of apologising the damage had been done.

Continue reading

I Never Knew A PC Steering Wheel Peripheral Would Be So Awesome


image

PeteI like to think I have a broad and varied interest in various computer game genres.  There are very few I won’t play, perhaps the most obvious being fighting games as I haven’t played anything since Tekken Tag Tournament back in the Playstation 2 days.  One genre I do enjoy on a casual basis is vehicle simulation (something which Alan berates me over whenever the subject is mentioned), ever since I first played a game called Aviator on the BBC Micro computer in the late 1980’s – you can see it was primitive, but I loved it.  From there followed space simulators and eventually came Microsoft Train Simulator in the late 1990’s, and Flight Simulator at around the same time.image

I adored them all, and in today’s market where simulators’ popularity is still enjoyed but somewhat over-saturated with crap like Street Cleaning Simulator available there are still a few gems out there, most of all perhaps is Euro Truck Simulator 2.  This is a game I can’t describe to anyone who doesn’t already have at least a passing interest in the genre, but for me it’s a relaxing way to unwind and just get lost behind the wheel of a truck, selling goods and making money for my fledgling haulage company.  I can picture a few people reading this with one eyebrow raised but that’s how it is for a lot of people who play these games, and as someone who doesn’t drive in the real world it’s as close as I’m going to get to doing that too.

Speaking of driving, that’s another genre I’ve always enjoyed to an extent, particularly arcade racers like GRID, the Burnout series and the Need For Speed franchise.  I’ve never truly appreciated the simulation racers like Gran Turismo, Forza and Project Cars, and until this week I couldn’t quite work out why.  Aside from being utterly useless at them.

I can’t quite remember why, but a few weeks back I developed a burning desire to own a steering wheel for the PC. I think it was while reading a review for Project Cars, as it looked like a game I’d enjoy – great graphics, a progressive career mode… Oh but wait, it’s a simulation racer, I’m terrible at those, never mind.  I couldn’t shake the thought that I’d probably otherwise enjoy the game as you can tinker with the cars themselves and race in true-to-life events at real circuits, but I’d spend more time bouncing off safety barriers and rear-ending my opponents than screaming down back straights at 200mph in something vaguely considered to be a straight line. I decided to read up on some player opinions rather than those of professional reviewers, and one verdict was pretty much unanimous – to get the most out of Project Cars it’s damn near essential to own a steering wheel.

Continue reading

Rock Band 4 – Ready For A Comeback?


image

PeteIt’ll be almost exactly five years to the day since we saw a Rock Band game before the release of Harmonix’s next offering in the music game genre. In fact it’ll be five years since we’ve seen anything in the music game genre, as the two titans Rock Band and Guitar Hero haven’t given us any new games whatsoever since 2010, and both are making a comeback this October with Rock Band 4 and Guitar Hero Live respectively. Is now the time for a comeback?

The reason why we’ve not seen a music game in so long is a direct result of the developers’ own doing. Over an initial period of five years between 2005 and 2010 we saw a ridiculous number of Rock Band and particularly Guitar Hero games – eight main titles (six Guitar Hero, two DJ Hero and Band Hero), five expansions and several more spinoffs for the PC and Nintendo DS such as Guitar Hero: On Tour. Add to that the three main Rock Band titles and their spinoffs including Beatles, Green Day and even Lego Rock Band and what we had was a hugely oversaturated market, contributing to the swift downfall of the genre starting in 2009.

Continue reading